The Roanoke Valley Horse Show 2001 -2016 Archived Content


 

The Roanoke Valley Horse Show was established in 1972 by the Roanoke Valley Horsemen’s Association. The Roanoke Valley Horse Show has been honored with the United States Equestrian Federation’s designation as a USEF Heritage Competition, the highest honor currently held by any Federation horse show. Then in 2016 the Roanoke Valley Horse Show moved to the Virginia Horse Center in Lexington, VA and the class list dropped a large portion of the classes and became a show for Saddlebreds. Finally in 2018 the name "Roanoke "disappeared.
For a number of years this was the official website for the Roanoke Valley Horse Show.

Content is from the site's 2001 - 2016 archived pages.

 

 

Roanoke Valley Horse Show moves to Lexington in 2016

By Rachel Lucas - Weekend Anchor / Reporter /www.wsls.com
June 10, 2016

The Roanoke Valley Horse show is June 20 - 25 at the Virginia Horse Center in Lexington, Virginia.

LEXINGTON (WSLS 10) - A long standing tradition that was cancelled last year is making a comeback, but in a different location.

The Roanoke Valley Horse Show was held at the Salem Civic Center for 43 years. It was cancelled last year due to lack of sponsorship. Although money has been an issue in the past, the show is back on in 2016.

It will be held at the Virginia Horse Center in Lexington.

John Nicholson, CEO of the Virginia Horse Center says they are delighted to be part of the renewal of one of the biggest horse shows in the nation.

"This is classic win, win, win," Nicholson said. "This is a win in that it makes sure that this traditional horse show continues. It's a win for all of the charities that benefit in Roanoke. And it's a win for the Virginia Horse Center because we can proudly show off our facility to more people."

The Roanoke Valley Horse show is June 20 - 25.

 

 

The Roanoke Valley Horse Show 2016

 

A Benefit Event for the Roanoke Valley:

 

The RVHA is excited to announce that the 2016 Roanoke Valley Horse Show will be held at the Virginia Horse Center June 20-25, 2016! This could not have been possible without the help and dedication of our Show Chairman, Stacey Wright, managers Steve Kildow and Andrew Ellis and other members of the show committee. Although we will be at a new location, the Roanoke Valley Horsemen's Association is committed to keeping this horse show's charitable contributions coming back to the Roanoke Valley and traditions of southern hospitality at the top of our priority lists! Please mark your calendars to join us!
 
The Roanoke Valley Horse Show is a non-profit volunteer organization that seeks to improve our Valley through its annual $13 million economic impact, and by donating the profits to health and human service organizations in our region. Proceeds are also directed to equine, environmental and conservancy causes.

The Roanoke Valley Horse Show was established in 1972 by the Roanoke Valley Horsemen's Association. It has since become the longest running professional sporting event in the Roanoke Valley and one of the top horse shows in the nation. Rated the highest level of competition in horse shows (AA) by the United States Equestrian Federation, the show awards more than $250,000 in total cash and prizes. The Roanoke Valley Horse Show has been honored with the United States Equestrian Federation’s designation as a USEF Heritage Competition, the highest honor currently held by any Federation horse show.

Every year, the RVHS features Hunter, Jumper, Racking, Roadster, Saddlebred,  & Western Divisions; Barrel Races, Children's Stick Horse Classic and the $50,000 Grand Prix.
 
Get in on the VA Trainers Incentive at
Roanoke Valley Horse Show 2016!

 

 

 

 

Roanoke Valley Horse Show name going by the wayside

May 10, 2018 / https://roanokeequestrian.com/

First its location changed. Then the class list dropped a large portion of the classes and became a show for Saddlebreds. And now the name is disappearing, too.

The Roanoke Valley Horse Show left the Salem Civic Center for a rebirth at the Virginia Horse Center in 2016. But that rebirth became more of a high-speed evolution. The hunter classes were gone by 2017 and the name had been tweaked to Roanoke Shenandoah Valley Horse Show. A Grand Prix would no longer cap off the weeklong schedule. And the support of Roanoke area businesses also was lost as the Roanoke Valley Horseman’s Association passed off the event to new hosts.

This year, the show will run just four days — June 20-23 — at the Virginia Horse Center. And Roanoke appears to be disappearing from its name. The artwork for the show lists it as the Shenandoah Classic Horse Show.

Lots has changed but there will still be plenty of high-stepping action if not high jumping action. And it is inevitable that even some of our most treasured horse show events will change over time, particularly as horse shows face the challenge of dropping participation.

Meanwhile, the Roanoke Valley Horseman’s Association is scheduled to hold a one-day community horse show at Green Hill Park Equestrian Center in Salem this summer. Watch for more details on that event.

 

 



 

2016

 

The Roanoke Valley Horse Show was established in 1972 by the Roanoke Valley Horsemen's Association. It has since become the longest running professional sporting event in the Roanoke Valley and one of the top horse shows in the nation. Rated the highest level of competition in horse shows (AA) by the United States Equestrian Federation, the show awards more than $250,000 in total cash and prizes. The Roanoke Valley Horse Show has been honored with the United States Equestrian Federation’s designation as a USEF Heritage Competition, the highest honor currently held by any Federation horse show.
 Every year, the RVHS features Hunter, Jumper, Racking, Roadster, Saddlebred, & Western Divisions and the $50,000 Grand Prix. Click Here to view photographs of previous horse shows.

 

Class Descriptions

Types of Horses and Events Present Each Year at RVHS

(Class refers to a breed of horse - each maximized for their respective event.)

Photograph By SayItOnTheWeb

 

THE AMERICAN SADDLE HORSE
The American saddle horse has been hailed as the world's most beautiful horse and also one of the most versatile. It was developed by early pioneers who desired a utility horse of beauty, easy gaits, good disposition, and stamina. The ideal American saddle horse is beautiful with much quality and fineness. It averages from 15 hands to 16 hands in height (hand is four inches) and averages in weight from 1,000 to 1,200 pounds. It should have a well-shaped, finely chiseled head, large bright eyes, small ears that are short, dainty, and used alertly. The neck should be long, fitting onto the head with a small throat latch, and fit into a sloping shoulder. Prominent withers, a short and level back, long sloping pasterns, and well-formed feet are desirable. American saddle horses are shown in three major divisions: five-gaited, three-gaited, and fine harness. They also are shown as pleasure and many of them have made excellent hunters and jumpers.

   

FIVE-GAITED HORSE
The five-gaited horse is the aristocrat of the show ring and is considered spectacular and exciting in a horse show. It wears a full mane and tail and is shown wearing quarter boots to protect the horse's front feet when performing. Five-gaited horses are shown at the three natural gaits of the breed --the walk, trot, and canter and the two man-made gaits --the slow gait and the rack. The trot is a two-beat gait that should be square and bold, with natural high action. Speed is desirable if done in form. The canter should be slow, rhythmic and done with rocking chair smoothness and executed on the correct leads (left lead when going to the left; right lead when going to the right). The slow gait should be a high methodical gait, done very slowly, and with high action particularly in front. The rack is a four-beat gait and free from any lateral motion or pacing. The knee and hock action should be snappy, and speed is desired if done in an elastic step-promptly and alertly. Classes for fivegaited horses are segregated as to sex, age, amateur, ladies', juvenile, open, and stake or championship events.

   

FINE HARNESS HORSE
A fine harness horse carries a full mane and tail and is judged at the walk and trot for action and general brilliance of appearance. This horse should have free movement of the shoulders and high knee action, as well as high hock action with legs well under the horse. It is driven to a light buggy designed to carry one person. Classes for the fine harness horse are designated by sex, age, amateur, ladies', open, and stake or championship events.

   

THREE-GAITED HORSE
The three-gaited horse performs the three natural gaits --the walk, trot, and canter --and is judged on action, conformation, animation, manners, and soundness. Shown with clipped mane and tail, the three-gaited horse should execute gaits in a slow, collected manner with high action. Head should be carried high, with an alert ear, and an overall air of brilliance. The walk should be prompt, showy, and done cheerfully at about four miles per hour without any dancing. The trot is the gait most emphasized and must be true, high in action, and well collected. Excessive speed is not desired. The canter should be slow, rhythmic, and done on the correct leads. Classes for three-gaited horses are designated by size, age, amateur, ladies', juvenile, open, an stake or championship events.

   

AMERICAN SADDLEBRED PLEASURE
The versatile American Saddlebred has proven to be the ideal pleasure mount. This division is open to mares and geldings shown by an amateur. They wear a full mane and tail which must be carried naturally and arc shown in three-gaited, five-gaited, pleasure driving, country, western, and pleasure equitation classes. Manners and suitability as a pleasure mount are paramount.

   

ROADSTERS
The roadster is the speed horse of the show ring. It is usually of the Standardbred breed, noted for speed at the trot and pace. However, in the show ring, the roadster is shown only at the trot. Two types of roadsters are for show --those suitable for bike and those suitable for buggy.
Occasionally one horse is suitable for both classes, but usually the buggy horse will have more scale and weight than the bike horse. The roadster should have an attractive appearance, balanced conformation, speed and action at the trot, and safe manners.The chief gait of the roadster is the trot. It trots at three different speeds --the jog, road gait, and trot as speed. At all speeds, it should work in form, with straight and true action. Animation and show ring presence should characterize the road horse, especially at the jog and road gait.
Roadsters should enter the ring in a clockwise direction at a jog. They are usually asked to road gait, then turn to a counterclockwise direction and jog, road gait, and trot at speed. They should go at full speed both ways of the ring and should stand quietly when lined up.Roadsters are judged on performance, conformance, animation, manners, and soundness. Class specifications for the roadster horse are either bike or buggy events and classified open, amateur, speed, and stake or championship events. They are also shown under saddle and asked to perform at the same gaits and worked in the same manner as when driven.

   

EQUITATION
Equitation or horsemanship is a division open to riders who have not reached their 18th birthday and are amateurs. All classes are judged solely on the rider's style and ability to control the horse. The horse is not judged or rated in this division.
Certain fundamentals of equitation are rigidly observed in judging. Riders are required to post with the action of the horse's front leg which is next to the ring fence. They are also required to canter the horse on the correct lead. Riders are sometimes asked to work individually. There are several tests a judge may choose. Some of those most frequently used are: pick up reins, dismount and mount, figure eights using correct diagonal and canter leads, ride without stirrups, and change horses. Some judges ask riders to answer questions on anatomy, tack, and equitation.
There are three types of equitation --saddle seat, hunter seat, and stock seat. These classifications can be broken down into designated classes by age, medal class, and stakes or championships.

   

WESTERN HORSE
The Western Horse is not necessarily one breed of horse, although the Quarter Horse, Appaloosa, and Paint dominate the classes. It is known for being levelheaded, moving with suppleness, and offering easy comfort for the rider. The pleasure horse should perform on a loose rein and have a long, slow stride.
The performance horse classes are designed to show the agility and athletic ability of the Western Horse. It must have a sudden burst of speed, a quick stop, and an easy turn on its haunches. The reining horse and working cow horse particularly exemplify a special talent of making successive 360 degree turns while remaining in position.

   

BARREL HORSE
Barrel Horse is a high-spirited, intelligent animal. No single breed is classified as a barrel horse, although Quarter Horses dominate the ranks. The barrel horse must be smooth in making turns, then deliver quick bursts of speed for the straight aways. The barrel horse may actually show less than twenty seconds in a class. Even though they show such a short time, the barrel horse must be in great physical condition, and have tremendous ability and awesome stamina.

   

THE RACKING HORSE
The racking horse is a gracefully built, good-looking mount, with long sloping neck, full flanks, flat smooth legs, and finely textured hair. Small to medium size, it averages 15 hands in height and approximately 1,000 lbs. in weight. The racking horse is exhibited with no artificial appliances, no boots or set tails. This breed is shown at the show walk, the slow rack, and the fast rack. Show walk is a smooth, collected, slow and easy gait. It is a distinctive four-beat gait displaying both style and grace. The horse is alert and well-mounted in the bridle. Slow rack is a relaxed four-beat gait with both style and action, neither a pace nor a trot. The neck should be arched with head and ears alert. This gait should be straight and square at all times. Fast rack is in the same form as the slow rack displaying style, action, and speed. At no time is form sacrificed for speed. In each of the three gaits, the horse must be collected and presented will. The rider must be relaxed and smooth in the saddle. At no time should the horse exemplify a gait with animated hock action. The racking horse must exhibit good conformation.

 

THE HUNTERS AND JUMPERS

   

Hunters:
A hunter is generally shown over a course of obstacles placed in the ring to simulate conditions encountered while fox hunting. It should go over the course at an even hunting pace, without hesitation, galloping with long easy strides close to the ground, land and move away, all in one motion. The judge looks for the finer points of smoothness, quality, and the general polish of the performance. It could be compared to judging an ice skater that performs smoothly with grace and poise. A hunter should also possess good manners. Hunters are faulted for any deviation from the above plus being faulted she same as open jumpers for touches, knockdowns, refusals, or falls.A Green Working Hunter is a horse of any age in its first or second year of showing. Horses in their first year arc shown over fences approximately 3'6" and in their second year over fences 3'9". Junior Hunter Classes are limited to horses over 14.2 hands, ridden by juniors who have not reached their 18th birthday. Fences are 3'6". Amateur-Owner Hunter Classes are limited to amateur riders over 18 years of age who own their own horse. In Hunter Under Saddle Classes, horses work at a walk, trot, and canter only, and do not jump.

   

Jumpers:
Jumper classes are the most popular with the spectators because they provide thrilling entertainment. The horse's performance over the obstacle is all that counts. The horse's manner of jumping is not considered, nor is its soundness. If the horse negotiates the entire course of obstacles without touching any, does not veer from the prescribed course, or refuse to jump an obstacle, the score is perfect.If, after all horses have completed, there are two or more with perfect scores, they jump the course again, usually with the obstacles raised above their original height. This is called a "Jump off",and the winners are thus determined.Jumper courses are designed to test the handiness, agility, training, and temperament of the competitors, as well as their ability to clear heights. The layout of the course, the distance between fences, their angles to one another, and the distance in which turns are made are just as important as the obstacles themselves. In some classes jump offs may occur directly after a horse has completed a clean first round. It will be shortened course with the fastest time and cleanest round being the winner. For this reason, notice that riders may walk a course on foot before a class, planning a strategy of how to ride the course in the best way. They will pace the distances from one jump to another to plan the number of strides it takes between obstacles. The riders also examine the jumps to see, up close, the degree of expertise it will take to jump a clear round.The rider's form is a very important part of a jumper's performance. Notice that he will lean forward to help the horse in the air, as well as put his hands forward making sure that he will not hit the horse's mouth in flight. In some cases, though, the rider will turn a horse as he leaves the ground in order to land and proceed directly to another jump to the right or left.In every case, always notice the clock at the end of the arena. Not only must the winner of a jumper class jump clean, but he must have the fastest time.

 

THE PONIES
All animals under 14.2 hands are classified as ponies and are eligible for pony classes unless there are other specifications. There are five-gaited and three-gaited pony classes where the ponies are judged at the same gaits and manners as the horses. Other classes in this division are for pleasure, roadster, and western ponies:

   

HACKNEY PONY
0ne of the oldest breeds in the horse kingdom, the Hackney is a carriage horse or pony which originated in England. Hackneys are the high steppers of the show ring, with extreme action both front and behind. They are shown with a vehicle called a viceroy, a miniature fine harness buggy. Hackneys should show much brilliance and show ring presence, but still give a picture of sheer daintiness and perfection. They are shown only at the trot but, in most classes, are judges at two speeds, the park pace and then the trot. Custom demands that they be shown with docked tail and mane braided close to the neck. At the trot, they should snap their knees and hocks, and their action should be high, straight, and true. Hackneys are judged on performance, conformation, animation, manners, and soundness. Hackney classes are classified as to age, height, ladies', amateur, open, pairs, tandem, gig, and state or championship events. The Hackney pony cannot be more that 14.2 hands.

   

HARNESS PONY
The harness pony was originated by crossing three pony breeds: the Hackney, Welsh, and Shetland. The harness pony has the high action and gracefulness of the Hackney; the desired conformation, spirit, and style of the Welsh; and the manners and size of the Shetland. The harness pony cannot exceed 50 inches in height.Harness ponies arc shown to a viceroy, carry full mane and tail, and are shown both ways of the ring at the park trot and at a more animated or faster gait as drive on or at will. Harness ponies should show brilliance, show ring presence, and much the same trot as a fine harness horse, but with more snap to their knees and hocks. They are judged on performance, conformation, animation, manners, and soundness.

 


Sponsors

 

Why Become a Sponsor
  • >>The Roanoke Valley Show has the highest rated level of competition, as deemed by the United States Equestrian Federation. Established in 1972 - makes it the official longest running professional sporting event in the Valley. It is among the top multi-breed horse shows in the nation, having more than 1,000 horses and a total purse of $250,000 in cash and prizes. Only your support brings this critical economic development to the Roanoke Valley.
  • >>More than $13.7 million in NEW money is bought into the Valley in the ONE week of the horse show! (Roanoke Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Report)
  • >>3000 trainers and exhibitors from across the United States with an average net worth of $757,000 attend the week-long show and will be exposed to your message.
  • >>More than 26,000 spectators will see your message.
  • >>Roanoke Valley's Bradley Free Clinic alone receives 50% of show profits each year to provide healthcare for the Valley's working poor!
  • >>Additional show profits go to help other organizations such as the following:
  1. Bradley Free Clinic (50% of Profit)
  2. Charity of City of Salem
  3. Healing Strides of Virginia
  4. Rescue Mission
  5. Roanoke Valley Horse Rescue
  6. Salvation Army
  7. W.E. Skelton 4-H Educational Center
  8. Virginia Horse Center
  9. 4-H Club Endowments
  10. Scholarships to Virginia Tech Agricultural School
  11. Scholarship to Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine
  12. Donations to Virginia Tech Equine Research Foundation
Your Support
ENHANCE YOUR PUBLIC IMAGE BY BEING AFFILIATED WITH A PREMIER SPORTING AND CHARITABLE EVENT!
We Count On Your Support!
  • >>Can bring your company new business.
  • >>Draws critical economic development to the Roanoke Valley.
  • >>Ties you and your company name to a prestigious, nationally-recognized event.
  • >>Helps local charities provide needed community services.
Choose from the following Sponsorships Opportunities:

>Grandprix Sponsor
>>Winners Circle Sponsor
>>Evening Sponsor
>>Grand Champion Sponsor
>>Blue Ribbon Sponsor
>>Outside Ring Sponsor
>>Stable Sponsor First Row
>>Stable Sponsor Second Row

>>Jump Sponsor Tuesday - Friday
>>Jump Sponsor Saturday
>>Class Sponsor
>>Championship Cooler Sponsor
>>Patron Sponsor
>>Program Advertising
>>Prize List Advertisers
>>Box Seat Information

To become a SPONSOR, DONATION CONTRIBUTOR, an ADVERTISERS PRIZE LIST
SPONSOR or to ADVERTISE in the Roanoke Valley Horse Show Program,

THANK YOU FOR ALL THE SUPPORT

Winners Circle Sponsors

Carter Machinery Co., Inc.
City of Salem
Don Bandy - Joe Bandy & Son, Inc.
First Team Auto Mall
Fox Grape Farms, Inc.
Marion Bradley Via Memorial Foundation
Moss & Rocovich, Attorneys at Law, PC

 

Grand Champion Sponsors

A Friend
Bent Tree Farm, LTD
Betty Carr Muse
Blue Ridge Copier
Boone Tractor
Bradley Free Clinic
Carilion Clinic
Carol S. Reedy
Catawba Equestrian Center, LLC
Charlotte Sandy
City of Roanoke
Donald M. Sutton, Sr.
Dr. and Mrs. Nelson B. Greene
East Belmont Farm, Keswick, VA
Farm Credit and Country Mortgages
Garnett E. Smith
Grand Home Furnishings
Hart Motor Co., Inc.

Holiday Inn Hotel - Tanglewood
Hollins University
Irene and Tom Brock
James and Rebecca Tobey
Jeanne T. Lucas
LewisGale Regional Health System
LM Sandy Gerald
Lois Farmer
Memorial to Frank VanBalen
Michael And Owen Weaver
Mr. & Mrs. Howard C. Lawrence
Mrs. George P. Moore, Jr.
Nancy Peterson
Nancy Peterson/ In memory of Guy Burkholder
Plastics One, Inc.
Q99
Roanoke County Economic Development
Roanoke Golf Cars

Sandy Anderson
Scott and Billie Greene
Sherrill and Maxine Smith
Sherwood Memorial Park
Southern States Cooperative, Inc.
Spectrum Design P.C.
Stone Bridge Equestrian Center, Natural Bridge, VA
The Big Lonely - Karen Banks
The Joiner Family
The Kroger Company
The Virginia Horse Center
Tractor Supply Company
UPHA Chapter 18
Walton Rutherfoord
WDBJ7
William J. and Barbara B. Lemon

 

 

Blue Ribbon Sponsors

Dr. Randall R. Rhea
Estelle N. Avner
Peter & Enoch Branstetter Farm
Stephen and Karen Waskey
Westaway Ridge Farm

 

 

 

 



 

2004

A Benefit Event for the Roanoke Valley:

The Roanoke Valley Horse Show is a non-profit volunteer organization that seeks to improve our Valley through its annual $13 million economic impact, and by donating the profits to health and human service organizations in our region. Proceeds are also directed to equine, environmental and conservancy causes.

 



2001

 

Featuring:

Hunter, Jumper, Racking,
Roadster, Saddlebred, Friesian, and
Western Divisions

Barrel Races

Childrens Stick Horse Class

Jack Russell Terrier Races

$50,000 Grand Prix

THE HORSES ARE HERE!

      We're already gearing up for the 30th Annual Roanoke Valley Horse Show! The Roanoke Valley Horsemen's Association, Inc. would like to thank our many visitors, sponsors, exhibitors, friends and volunteers for making it possible for us to produce a show of growth, success, and prominence. Our show attracts more than 1,000 horses and 26,000 spectators, an economic impact each year of over $13.7 million to the Roanoke community!

Thank you for sharing in this special community event!

 
"Roanoke Valley Horse Show is in a league of it's own...Southern hospitality is second to none...Exhibitors show before some of the largest and most enthusiastic crowds of their entire season." (an exerpt from Saddle & Bridle - By Brenda Pulis)

Location: Salem Civic Center Complex, Salem, Virginia

Featuring:

  • Hunter, Jumper, Racking, Roadster, Saddlebred, Friesian, and Western Divisions

  • Barrel Races
  • Children’s Stick Horse Class
  • Jack Russell Terrier Races
  • $50,000 Grand Prix

Statistics:

  • 1,000+ horses (average value of a show horse: $100,000)

  • 3,000 trainers and exhibitors (exhibitors’ average net worth: $757,000)
  • 26,000+ spectators

Economic Impact:

  • Over $13.7 million in new money is brought into the Roanoke Valley during the one week of the horse show.

Local and National Prestige:

  • The longest running sporting event in the Roanoke Valley.

  • Rated the highest level of competition in horse shows (A3) by the American Horse Shows Association. One of the largest shows in the nation.
  • Has one of largest Grand Prix purses in the country: $50,000. Over $250,000 in total cash and prizes are awarded.

Charitable Support:

  • 50% of show profits is donated to the Roanoke Valley’s Bradley Free Clinic, which provides medical and dental care to the Valley’s working poor.

  • Additional show profits go to the 4-H Center, 4-H endowments, scholarships for the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, and annually-selected area non-profit organizations.

The show was established in 1971, and is sponsored by the Roanoke Valley Horsemen’s Association.

 

Contact: June Camper, Executive Director

P.O. Box 8656
Roanoke, Virginia 24014

Phone: (540) 389-7847
Fax: (540) 389-5066

 


 

Horse Talk:

 

 

    • AGED: A horse that is ten (10) years or older.

    • AHSA: The American Horse Shows Association. Founded in 1917, this body governs American equine sports.

    • AMATEUR: One who rides or drives for the love of the sport and not as a profession or for profit.

    • APPOINTMENTS: The correct bridling, saddlery, harnessing, vehicles, etc. used with different types of horses, and which have been standardized by custom.

    • BIKE: The modern racing sulky with two bicycle-type wheels to which a roadster horse is driven at trotting or pacing gaits, though only the former is acceptable at horse shows.

    • CANTER: A threebeat gait; a slow, collected gallop, natural to the American Saddlebred. In western classes it is known as a lope.

    • COMBINATION: A series of jumps set at related distances apart and thus requiring the horse to take a set number of strides (1 or 2) between each obstacle. If the horse refuses the second or third obstacle in a combination, he must rejump the entire combination.

    • CONFORMATION: The comparison --as to physical characteristics only --of a given horse to an ideal perfect specimen of his particular breed.

    • FALLS: A fall of rider or horse. Under F.E.I. rules, falls count eight faults. The rider may continue. A fall eliminates the rider and horse according to AHSA.

    • FAULT: A penalty point.

    • GAITS: The natural gaits of the horse are the walk, trot, and canter; the rack and slow gait are artificial.

    • HABITS: Refers to the costume worn by the rider or driver which has been standardized by costume according to the time of day and type of horse.

    • HAND: The unit by which the height of a horse is measured. A hand is equal to four inches. A horse measures from the ground at the front leg to the top of the shoulder, in "hands."

    • JUNIOR: Any horse four years old and under is classified as a junior horse.

    • JUNIOR EXHIBITOR: A rider who has not yet reached the 18th birthday as of December I (last year).

    • LADIES: Any event in a horse show in which the horses are exhibited only by women. Only mares and geldings are shown.

    • LIVERPOOL: A spread jump set over water or a box designed to simulate water.

    • MODEL : A type of class, judged on conformation and finish only; the entries are shown in hand.

    • NOVICE: A horse which has not won three first place ribbons in the division in which he is entered.

    • OPEN CLASS: One in which any horse of a specified breed is eligible, regardless of age, sex, number of first ribbons, or the amateur or professional status of the rider or driver.

    • OXER: A fence appearing as two vertical Jumps placed several feet apart to test the horse's ability to Jump a spread. Usually not as high as a vertical Jump, but may be.

    • PONY : A pony is not a baby horse. When full grown, a pony does not exceed 14 hands 2 inches in height (58") from the ground to the base of his neck. For purposes of hunter competition, all ponies are ridden by Juniors and are divided into three categories: Small Pony-not exceeding 12 hands and 2 inches; Medium Pony"-over 12 hands and 2 inches but not exceeding 13 hands 2 inches; Large Pony-over 13 hands 2 inches but not exceeding 14 hands 2 inches.

    • QUARTER BOOTS: The white protective boots worn by five-gaited horses to prevent damage to the front feet due to overstepping by the back feet.

    • RACK: One of the gaits of the five-gaited horses, the rack is executed in four-beat cadence, each foot striking the ground separately.

    • RECOGNIZED: This term refers to the official recognition of a horse show by the American Horse Shows Association, Inc.

    • RESERVE CHAMPION: In a Championship class, the second place winner is designated as "Reserve Champion."

    • RIBBON COLORS: First place, blue; second, red; third, yellow; fourth, white; fifth, pink; sixth, green; seventh, purple; eighth, brown.

    • ROAD GATE: A modestly rapid trot performed by the road horse or roadster, at a speed designed to cover long distances without unduly tiring the horse.

    • SEAT AND HANDS: A term referring to the ability of a rider to sit in the saddle with grace and control of his mount.

    • SLOW GAIT: A stepping gait similar to, but slower than, the rack. One of the artificial gaits of the five-gaited horse.

    • SPREAD: Distance from front to back of an obstacle. In a water jump, that distance is often 14 feet.

    • SQUARE: In all classes, gaits of the horse should be even, natural, balanced and true.

    • STAKE: A championship, or preliminary to championship class.

    • STRIP: To remove the saddle from the horse so that the judge may check his conformation.

    • TIE: To rate the horse as it finishes in a class-1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.

    • TIME ALLOWED: The time, determined by the length of the course, in which the competitors are required to complete the course. Those exceeding the time allowed are penalized 1/4 fault for each second over the time allowed.

    • TROT: A balanced, two-beat diagonal gait.

    • VERTICAL: An obstacle consisting of two end poles called standards with several rails connecting the standards. It is a fence of height with not spread.

    • WALK-TROT: Another term for the three-gaited Saddle horse; it is used to distinguish between three and five-gaited Saddle horses.

    • WALKING THE COURSE: the stepping off or measurement of the strides between obstacles. Allows the riders, according to their measurements, to learn the proper number of strides between jumps that will produce the smoothest round of jumping.

       
       

      ASHA TABLE - Knockdown classes:

      Knockdown of Obstacle
      Standard or Wing .................................4 Faults

      Any Foot in Liverpool,
      Ditch or Water ................................4 Faults

      First Disobedience ..............................3 Faults

      Second Disobedience (cumulative) .............6 Faults

      Third Disobedience (cumulative) ............Elimination

      Fall of Horse and/or Rider ......................Elimination

      Exceeding the "Time Limit"- (being twice the time allowed)....................................................Elimination

      Jumping Obstacles Out of Order ............Elimination

       


 

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